Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
low fodmap chicken bone broth in mason jars on a white background.

Low FODMAP Chicken Bone Broth (Instant Pot / Slow Cooker)


5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

  • Author: Gail Gromaski
  • Total Time: 3 hours 25 minutes
  • Yield: 10-12 cups 1x

Description

Save money while adding incredible flavor to soups, gravies, sauces, and more with this homemade low FODMAP chicken bone broth! Taking only about 15 minutes of hands-on time, this low FODMAP chicken broth becomes so flavorful when made in the Instant Pot or a slow cooker. It's also Paleo, Whole30, low carb, Keto, gluten-free and dairy-free.


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 2 tablespoons garlic-infused olive oil
  • 1 chicken carcass, reserved from a 3-4 pound chicken cooked with low FODMAP ingredients*
  • 2 large carrots, peeled or unpeeled, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 cup leek, dark green parts only, coarsely chopped (from 1 large leek)
  • 1 medium stalk celery or 4 large radishes, coarsely chopped (about 1/2 cup)*
  • 1 tablespoon dried chives
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 6 sprigs fresh parsley, or 1 tablespoon dried parsley leaves
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme, or 1 tablespoon dried thyme leaves
  • 12 cups cold water, or enough to cover but not going over the max fill line on the Instant Pot
  • 3 bay leaves

Instructions

Instant Pot Instructions:

  1. Sauté carcass {Optional but highly recommended – see note}: Hit "Sauté" on your 6-quart Instant Pot, 8-quart Instant Pot, or comparable electric pressure cooker. Once the display reads "Hot," add garlic-infused olive oil, and swirl the pot to coat. Using tongs, add chicken carcass, and sauté for 1 minute per side. Remove carcass to a plate.
  2. Sauté veggies: Add chopped carrots, leek greens, and celery, and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Deglaze: Hit “Cancel” on the Instant Pot. Slowly pour in 1 cup of the water and scrape the bottom of the pot clean with a plastic spoon or spatula (I love my Instant Pot spatula).
  4. Add remaining ingredients: Add dried chives, peppercorns, and apple cider vinegar and stir. Return chicken carcass to the pot and lay parsley and thyme sprigs around the carcass. Cover with the remaining 11 cups of water (or until everything is covered but you’re still below the Instant Pot’s max fill line). Lay bay leaves on top of the liquid.
  5. Pressure Cook: Close the Instant Pot lid, set the pressure release valve to “Sealing,” hit the “Pressure Cook” or “Manual” button, and set the timer for 120 minutes (2 hours). The Instant Pot will take about 27 minutes to come to pressure. Once the cooking cycle has completed, allow the pressure to release naturally (about 38 minutes).
  6. Strain: Open Instant Pot lid. Using tongs, remove large pieces of chicken carcass and veggies. Ladle broth through a fine mesh sieve over a large bowl to remove remaining chicken pieces, veggies, and herbs (you may need to do this in a few batches depending on how large your bowl is). Strain again through a cheesecloth if you want to remove the finest particles.
  7. Portion and cool: Ladle strained broth into a heat-resistant measuring cup and pour desired portion amounts (1-cup, 3-cups, etc.) into glass jars or plastic containers. Allow to cool fully at room temperature before securing lids onto containers.
  8. Store: store in air-tight containers in the refrigerator for 3-4 days or in the freezer for up to 6 months. Thaw frozen broth in the refrigerator overnight before using. Once thawed, use a dinner spoon to scrape and discard the fat cap off the top of the broth prior to using if desired.
  9. Serve: Use in low FODMAP soups, stews, gravies, sauces, and other recipes that call for chicken broth, like my Low FODMAP Instant Pot Chicken and Rice Soup, Low FODMAP Leek and Potato Soup with Bacon, Low FODMAP Red Enchilada Sauce, Low FODMAP Sourdough Stuffing (Dressing), Quick Low FODMAP Gravy, and countless others.

Slow Cooker Instructions

  1. Sauté carcass {Optional but highly recommended – see note}: Place a large skillet on medium heat on the stovetop. Once hot, add garlic-infused olive oil, and swirl the skillet to coat the bottom in oil. Using tongs, add chicken carcass, and sauté for 1 minute per side. Remove carcass to a large plate.
  2. Sauté veggies: Add chopped carrots, leek greens, and celery, and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Deglaze: Slowly pour 1 cup of water into the skillet and scrape up anything on the bottom with a spatula. Pour or ladle skillet contents into a slow cooker (I use a 6-quart Crock-Pot).
  4. Add remaining ingredients: Add dried chives, peppercorns, and apple cider vinegar and stir. Return chicken carcass to the slow cooker and lay parsley and thyme sprigs around the carcass. Cover with the remaining 11 cups of water (or until everything is covered). Lay bay leaves on the top of the liquid.
  5. Slow cook: Close the lid and slow cook for 8-12 hours on low (the longer, the better).
  6. Strain: Open slow cooker lid. Remove large pieces of chicken carcass and veggies with tongs. Ladle broth through a fine mesh sieve over a large bowl to remove remaining chicken pieces, veggies, and herbs (you may need to do this in a few batches depending on how large your bowl is). Strain again through a cheesecloth if you want to remove the finest particles.
  7. Portion and cool: Ladle strained broth into a heat-resistant measuring cup and pour desired portion amounts (1-cup, 3-cups, etc.) into glass jars or plastic containers. Allow to cool fully at room temperature before securing lids onto containers.
  8. Store: Store in air-tight containers in the refrigerator for 3-4 days or in the freezer for up to 6 months. Thaw frozen broth in the refrigerator overnight before using. Once thawed, use a dinner spoon to scrape and discard the fat cap off the top of the broth prior to using if desired.
  9. Serve: Use in low FODMAP soups, stews, gravies, sauces, and other recipes that call for chicken broth, like my Low FODMAP Leek and Potato Soup with Bacon, Lazy Low FODMAP Pumpkin Soup with Bacon, Low FODMAP Red Enchilada Sauce, Low FODMAP Sourdough Stuffing, my Quick Low FODMAP Gravy, and countless others.

Notes

  • Cooking times reflect that for the Instant Pot only.
  • Yield will vary depending on cooking method and the amount of time cooked. When testing this recipe in a 6-quart Instant Pot, it yielded about 12 cups of broth after straining. When cooking in the slow cooker for 12 hours, it yielded about 10 cups of broth after straining.
  • Chicken carcass: I use the remaining chicken carcass with a bit of meat left on from my Low FODMAP Instant Pot Whole Chicken One-Pot Meal or Low FODMAP Air Fryer Rotisserie Chicken recipes, or Samin Nosrat's Buttermilk Marinated Roast Chicken recipe from Salt Fat Acid Heat (if you're lactose-intolerant, you can make homemade lactose-free buttermilk by combining 2 cups of lactose-free milk with 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or vinegar and letting it sit for 5 minutes), but any chicken carcass from a 3-4 pound chicken cooked with low FODMAP ingredients should work.
  • Celery: per Monash University’s Low FODMAP Diet App, celery contains the FODMAP mannitol and is low FODMAP at about ¼ of a medium stalk or 10 grams per serving. We’re adding 1 medium stalk (about 45 grams) across 10-12 servings, coming to 4.5-3.75 grams of celery per serving were we not to remove it from the broth. As we strain all the veggies and chicken pieces, this most likely results in even fewer FODMAPs remaining in the broth (impossible to know how much, though). Depending on what you’re using this broth for and if you are sensitive to mannitol, you may want to omit the celery to prevent FODMAP stacking. You can use radishes instead, which are currently listed as FODMAP-free, or omit the celery and radishes altogether.
  • Fresh vs. dried parsley and thyme: it’s ideal to use fresh herbs, but you may not always have them on hand when you need to make the broth. If you use dried herbs, you may need to strain the broth twice through a fine mesh sieve or a cheesecloth to remove them all.
  • Sauté carcass: this step adds incredible flavor to the broth, but it does make the broth darker in color. If you prefer a lighter colored broth, simply skip the carcass sauté and go right to sauteing the veggies.
  • Where’s the salt? Salt isn’t typically added to chicken stocks or broth as it is a base for other recipes. Salt should be added to taste of whatever recipe you’re using the broth in.
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Time to come to and release pressure: 65 minutes
  • Cook Time: 125 minutes
  • Category: Soups and Stews
  • Method: Instant Pot / Slow Cooker
  • Cuisine: American